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Math 111 - Spring 2019

Published By: Bingham's Lens

A collection of visual and written ideas produced by the mathematical students of Western New Mexico University while working with adjunct faculty member, Tyler Bingham (Spring Semester 2019).

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Josh Arellano

"God used beautiful mathematics in creating the world."
-Paul Dirac

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Kalee Brownwood

"Pure mathematics is, in it's way, the poetry of logical ideas."
-Albert Einstein

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Joel Burroughs

"Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater."
-Albert Einstein

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Ignacio Correa

"Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas."
-Albert Einstein

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Jazmin Dominguez

“Without mathematics, there's nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers.”
-Shakuntala Devi

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Maria Flores

“Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater.”
-Albert Einstein

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Khalil Gardley

"Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical idea."
-Albert Einstein

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Matthew Holguin

"The advancement and perfection of Mathematics are intimately connected with the prosperity of the State."
-Napoleon

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Kalab Lambert

"Coming Soon"

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Adrian Leos

“The mathematical sciences particularly exhibit order, symmetry, and limitation; and these are the greatest forms of the beautiful. .”
-Aristotle



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William Maddox

"Coming Soon."

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Haven Norero

"Mathematics is the most beautiful and most powerful creation of the human spirit."
-Stefan Banach

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Gary Placencio

"Coming Soon"

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Hannah Riley

Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are greater.
-Albert Einstein

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Mckenzie-Dono Rothschild-Potter

“Do not worry about your difficulty in mathmatics I can assure you mine are still greater. ”
-Albert Einstein

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Daylon Russell

"Coming Soon"

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Sonny Torres

“A Mathematician who is not also something of a poet will never be a complete mathematician.”
-Karl Weierstrass

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Ricky Villalobos

"Mathematics is the science of what is clear by itself."
-Carl Gustov

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Elizabeth Whitaker

"Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas."
-Albert Einstein

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Aiden Young

"Coming Soon"

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Flatland - A Romance of Many Dimensions

I AM about to appear very inconsistent. In previous sections I have said that all figures in Flatland present the appearance of a straight line; and it was added or implied, that it is consequently impossible to distinguish by the visual organ between individuals of different classes: yet now I am about to explain to my Spaceland critics how we are able to recognize one another by the sense of sight.

If however the Reader will take the trouble to refer to the passage in which Recognition by Feeling is stated to be universal, he will find this qualification - "among the lower classes." It is only among the higher classes and in our temperate climates that Sight Recognition is practised.

That this power exists in any regions and for any classes is the result of Fog; which prevails during the greater part of the year in all parts save the torrid zones. That which is with you in Spaceland an unmixed evil, blotting out the landscape, depressing the spirits, and enfeebling the health, is by us recognized as a blessing scarcely inferior to air itself, and as the Nurse of arts and Parent of sciences. But let me explain my meaning, without further eulogies on this beneficent Element.

If Fog were non-existent, all lines would appear equally and indistinguishably clear; and this is actually the case in those unhappy countries in which the atmosphere is perfectly dry and. transparent. But wherever there is a rich supply of Fog objects that are at a distance, say of three feet, are appreciably dimmer than those at a distance of two feet eleven inches; and the result is that by careful and constant experimental observation of comparative dimness and clearness, we are enabled to infer with great exactness the configuration of the object observed.

An instance will do more than a volume of generalities to make my meaning clear.

Suppose I see two individuals approaching whose rank I wish to ascertain. They are, we will suppose, a Merchant and a Physician, or in other words, an Equilateral Triangle and a Pentagon: how am I to distinguish them?

By: Edwin A. Abbott - Exercept from, "Flatland - A Romance of Many Dimensions"