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Math 097 - Fall 2018

Published By: Bingham's Lens

A collection of visual and written ideas produced by the mathematical students of Western New Mexico University while working with adjunct faculty member, Tyler Bingham (Fall Semester 2018).

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Victoria Anaya

"Mathematics - the unshaken Foundation of Sciences, and the plentiful Fountain of Advantage to human affairs."
-Isaac Barrow

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Ariadna Armendariz

"The only way to learn mathematics is to do mathematics."
-Paul Halmos

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Danielle Barba

“The most painful thing about mathematics is how far away you are from being able to use it after you have learned it.”
-James Newman

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Hannah Davenport

"Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas."
-Albert Einstein

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Samuel Davenport

“Mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things”
-Henri Poincare

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Jessey Drusendahl

“A lot of music is mathematics. It’s balance.”
-Mel Brooks

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Aaron Escobar

"Without mathematics, there's nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers."
-Shakuntala Devi

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Jessika Espinoza

“"Obvious" is the most dangerous word in mathematics”
-E.T. Bell

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Cheyanne Frost

"My life seemed to be a series of events and accidents. Yet when I look back, I see a pattern."
-Benoît B. Mandelbrot

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Amanda Gommer

“One of the most amazing things about mathematics is the people who do math aren't usually interested in application, because mathematics itself is truly a beautiful art form. It's structures and patterns, and that's what we love, and that's what we get off on.”
-Danica McKellar



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Stephanie Guzman

"Mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things."
-Henri Poincare

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Savanna Holden

"Mathematics is written for mathematicians. "
-Nicolaus Copernicus

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Jadaa Jacobs

"Mathematics is a game played according to certain simple rules with meaningless marks on paper."
-David Hilbert

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Destiney Johnson

"Mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things."
-Henri Poincare

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Jack Lalio

Coming Soon

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Karisma Rodriguez

“In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them.”
-John Von Neumann

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Maggie Roe

“Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater.”
-Albert Einstein

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Alejandro Vallejos

"I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy."
-John Adams

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Flatland - A Romance of Many Dimensions

I AM about to appear very inconsistent. In previous sections I have said that all figures in Flatland present the appearance of a straight line; and it was added or implied, that it is consequently impossible to distinguish by the visual organ between individuals of different classes: yet now I am about to explain to my Spaceland critics how we are able to recognize one another by the sense of sight.

If however the Reader will take the trouble to refer to the passage in which Recognition by Feeling is stated to be universal, he will find this qualification - "among the lower classes." It is only among the higher classes and in our temperate climates that Sight Recognition is practised.

That this power exists in any regions and for any classes is the result of Fog; which prevails during the greater part of the year in all parts save the torrid zones. That which is with you in Spaceland an unmixed evil, blotting out the landscape, depressing the spirits, and enfeebling the health, is by us recognized as a blessing scarcely inferior to air itself, and as the Nurse of arts and Parent of sciences. But let me explain my meaning, without further eulogies on this beneficent Element.

If Fog were non-existent, all lines would appear equally and indistinguishably clear; and this is actually the case in those unhappy countries in which the atmosphere is perfectly dry and. transparent. But wherever there is a rich supply of Fog objects that are at a distance, say of three feet, are appreciably dimmer than those at a distance of two feet eleven inches; and the result is that by careful and constant experimental observation of comparative dimness and clearness, we are enabled to infer with great exactness the configuration of the object observed.

An instance will do more than a volume of generalities to make my meaning clear.

Suppose I see two individuals approaching whose rank I wish to ascertain. They are, we will suppose, a Merchant and a Physician, or in other words, an Equilateral Triangle and a Pentagon: how am I to distinguish them?

By: Edwin A. Abbott - Exercept from, "Flatland - A Romance of Many Dimensions"